Princeton Capital Blog

This Week’s Market Commentary

June 27th, 2011

This week brings us the release of four economic reports for the markets to digest, with three of them being considered important.

One of those three is one of the more important reports we see each month.

There is relevant data or events scheduled for each day except Thursday, so it will likely be another active week for mortgage rates.

May’s Personal Income and Outlays data will be posted early this morning. This report gives us an indication of consumer ability to spend and current spending activity. They are important because consumer spending makes up two-thirds of the U.S. economy.

Analysts are expecting to see an increase of 0.3% in income and a 0.1% rise in the spending portion of the report. Smaller than expected increases should be good news for the bond market and mortgage rates.

June’s Consumer Confidence Index (CCI) is the second report of the week. It will be posted late Tuesday morning. It is important to the financial markets because it measures consumer willingness to spend. If consumers are more confident about their own financial situations, they are likely more apt to make large purchases in the near future.

Current forecasts are calling for a reading of 60.3, down from last month’s 60.8 reading. The lower the reading, the better the news for bonds and mortgage rates.

Friday has two reports scheduled, with the first coming from the University of Michigan who will update their Index of Consumer Sentiment for May. This index gives us a measurement of consumer willingness to spend.

As with Tuesday’s CCI, if consumers are more comfortable with their own financial situations, they are more apt to make large purchases in the near future. Since consumer spending makes up two-thirds of the U.S. economy, any related data has the potential to affect bond trading and mortgage rates.

The second report of the day and the last data of the week is the Institute of Supply Management’s (ISM) manufacturing index for June late Friday morning. This index measures manufacturer sentiment by surveying trade executives on current business conditions. A reading above 50 means that more surveyed executives felt business improved during the month than those who felt it had worsened.

Analysts are expecting a reading of 51.1. That would indicate that manufacturers felt business worsened from the previous month, when we saw a 53.5 reading. Good news for bonds and mortgage rates would be a weaker than expected reading, particularly something below the recessionary threshold of 50.0.

Overall, tomorrow and Tuesday’s data should bring some volatility in trading and mortgage rates, but Friday’s ISM report is definitely the most important of the week.

Princeton Capital

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